Apr 22, 2014
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Makeover Plastic surgery in South Korea that some overseas patients struggling to get through passport control on their way home after the operations

  • Some hospitals in South Korea are offering ‘plastic surgery certificates’ to help overseas patients through passport control on their way home
  • These patients are often seen to have bigger eyes and higher noses.They often also have slimmer chins than on their passport photos.South Korea is now the plastic surgery capital of the world, figures show 
    When people go under the knife for plastic surgery they hope to come out of the operation looking a bit different and a lot better.

They usually do not, however, anticipate looking so different that they are unrecognisable.However, some of South Korea’s plastic surgeons are so talented that they are leaving their patients with an unexpected problem, it has been claimed.

Those who have flown in from abroad to have the operations are, in some cases, so transformed that they are struggling to get through passport control on the way home,According to Korean sites Onboa and Munhwa, some hospitals have resorted to handing out ‘plastic surgery certificates’ to patients to enable them to get home.

These certificates are said to include the patient’s passport number, the name of the hospital they were treated at and the length of their visit to South Korea.

The theory goes that these certificates can smooth their path through passport control.While hospitals have been aware of the problem for a number of years, it is said to be becoming an increasingly common issue.In 2009, 23 Chinese women are said to have struggled to return to China from South Korea after undergoing surgery.

The women were stopped at passport control because they were noted to have bigger eyes, higher noses and slimmer chins than were shown on their passports, After careful checks had been carried out, the women were allowed into China but they were all advised to renew their passports immediately.

‘After they took off their huge hats and big sunglasses following our request, we saw them looking different, with bandages and stitches here and there,’ Shanghai Hongqiao Airport officer Chen Tao told China Daily.’We had to compare their uncorrected parts with their photos very carefully,’ he added.

South Korea is rapidly becoming the home of plastic surgery and people there have the most cosmetic procedures per head of population, according to global figures released last year by the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons.

Indeed, one in every 77 people in South Korea now goes under the knife or needle in a bid to improve their looks.Shockingly, some 20 per cent of women aged 19 to 49 in Seoul admit to going under the knife and one of the most popular procedures involves reducing excess skin in the upper eyelid to make the eyes appear bigger and more ‘Western’.It is believed that the rise of the country’s music industry is behind the boom, and many patients visit clinics with photos of celebrities, asking surgeons to emulate American noses or eyes.

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Apr 22, 2014
dimpal

Using Millions of Grains Sand Art made by the Tibetan Lamas

From all the artistic traditions of Tantric Buddhism, that of painting with colored sand ranks as one of the most unique and exquisite. In Tibetan this art is called dul-tson-kyil-khor, which literally means "mandala of colored powders." Millions of grains of sand are painstakingly laid into place on a flat platform over a period of days or weeks.

Formed of a traditional prescribed iconography that includes geometric shapes and a multitude of ancient spiritual symbols, the sand-painted mandala is used as a tool for re-consecrating the earth and its inhabitants

On previous US tours the lamas have displayed this sacred art in museums across the country, including the Arthur Sackler Gallery, Washington; Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago; Peabody Essex Museum, Salem; the Indianapolis Art Museum, Indianapolis; Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, and The Provincial Museum of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.

The lamas begin the work by drawing an outline of the mandala on the wooden platform, which requires the remainder of the day. The following days see the laying of the colored sands, which is effected by pouring the sand from traditional metal funnels called chak-purs. Each monk holds a chak-pur in one hand, while running a metal rod on its grated surface; the vibration causes the sands to flow like liquid.

Traditionally most sand mandalas are deconstructed shortly after their completion. This is done as a metaphor of the impermanence of life. The sands are swept up and placed in an urn; to fulfill the function of healing, half is distributed to the audience at the closing ceremony, while the remainder is carried to a nearby body of water, where it is deposited. The waters then carry the healing blessing to the ocean, and from there it spreads throughout the world for planetary healing.

Using Millions of Grains Sand Art made by the Tibetan Lamas Using Millions of Grains Sand Art made by the Tibetan Lamas

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Apr 15, 2014
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Swimming Pool Like Optical Illusion titled POOL, loss of color Created by Jeroen Bisscheroux

The Swimming pool looks  like  optical illusion  with  carpet  painting created  by  artist Jeroen Bisscheroux  it’s a completely flat art installation and optical illusion. The carpet-like painting is titled POOL, loss of color and it depicts a nearly empty, deteriorating swimming pool.Bisscheroux’s work is meant to evoke more than just a sense of wonder as it bridges two tragedies that took place in Japan. One is the 2011 tsunami that affected the Sendai region, and the other is the related events involving the meltdown of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant.

The concept behind the installation is that it “brings the impact of the disaster back to human proportions; the understandable human proportions of the dimension of a swimming pool.” To the artist, water is simultaneously relaxing as well as a vehicle for catastrophe. Bisscheroux wanted to create more awareness that tragedy isn’t just something that happens on the other side of the world, but it can, in fact, happen right in your backyard. It brings these issues, like the events in Fukushima, into the forefront so we don’t forget about the people affected.

Swimming Pool Like Optical Illusion titled POOL, loss of color Created by Jeroen Bisscheroux 

Swimming Pool Like Optical Illusion titled POOL, loss of color Created by Jeroen Bisscheroux 

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Apr 15, 2014
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Magic Carpet Spreads over a Church Floor in morocco installation by Miguel Chevalier

‘magic carpets 2014′ by french artist miguel chevalier is an interactive light display spread out across the floor of the former sacré coeur church in casablanca, morocco. covering it with a huge layer of light, the work references the world of biology, microorganisms, and cellular automata – as cells have the ability to multiply in abundance, divide and merge at different paces. pieces come together, fall apart and transform in shape at rapid speeds. the displayed organic universe mingles with a digital construction of overlapping pixels.

Watch the video below to see the magical experience in action.

Magic Carpet Spreads over a Church Floor in morocco installation by Miguel Chevalier

Magic Carpet Spreads over a Church Floor in morocco installation by Miguel Chevalier

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Apr 14, 2014
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Balloon Chair Floating in Mid-Air Designed by Japanese studio

Japanese studio h220430 has created a chair that looks like it is held in mid-air by balloons, which will go on show at Ventura Lambratein Milan on Tuesday.

A follow-up to the Balloon Bench designed by h220430 in 2011, the Balloon Chair appears to by suspended beneath ten helium balloons.

The chair aims to recreate the feeling that Pascal, the protagonist of 1950s film Le Ballon Rouge, has when a cluster of balloons carried him over Paris, rescuing him from a group of bullies.

Whereas the bench was suspended from four anchor points in a ceiling to maintain the illusion of flight, the chair fixes to a wall.

The leather-covered seat is made from fibre-reinforced plastic, steel and urethane, while the balloons are made from fibre-reinforced plastic and cord, meaning they cannot be deflated.

The designers will be showing the Balloon Chair at Ventura Lambrate from 8 to 12 April, during Milan’s design week.

Balloon Chair Floating in Mid-Air Designed by Japanese studio Balloon Chair Floating in Mid-Air Designed by Japanese studio

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